Chad Johnson

Associate Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Associate Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Assoc Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Senior Sustainability Scientist
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Associate Professor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Honors Faculty
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Honors Faculty
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Instructor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352
Instructor
Faculty
WEST Campus
Mailcode
2352

Biography

J. Chadwick (Chad) Johnson is an associate professor in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences in New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. Johnson joined the ASU faculty in 2006 after serving as a lecturer in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of California-Davis in 2005. He received his doctorate in biology from the University of Kentucky in 2003 and attended the University of Toronto as a National Science Foundation (NSF) International postdoctoral research fellow (2003-05). He earned his master's degree in biology at Illinois State University in 1998 and his bachelor's degree in biopsychology from Earlham College (Richmond, Ind.) in 1990. 

Johnson's teaching experience prior to his arrival at ASU's West campus includes being an instructor of behavioral ecology at the University of Toronto (2004-05) and lecturer at UC-Davis (2003, 2005).

Johnson's scholarly interests include studying animal behavior at the levels of mechanisms, individuals, populations and communities, and he is particularly interested in the way in which behavioral expression - e.g., aggression level - is correlated across distinct behavioral-ecological contexts (e.g., foraging and anti-predator contexts). To this end, Johnson tracks animals through their life cycles, studying behavior in conjunction with ecological variations found in nature. 

In conjunction with the Central Arizona-Phoenix Long Term Ecological Research Project, his most recent research focuses on the study of behavior and population ecology and genetics of desert-versus-urban populations of black widow spiders native to Arizona, as well as African widow species found in urban habitats of the southeastern United States and southern California.   It is Johnson's hope that by concentrating on the dynamic interaction between the behavior, ecology and population genetics of these urban infestations, the ineffectual application of pesticides can be curtailed. His research has appeared in such publications as Animal Behaviour, Behavioral Ecology, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology,and Ethology.

In addition to his research, Johnson teaches undergraduate labs and courses in animal behavior and ecology. In 2010, he joined the Barrett Honors faculty. Johnson has also developed a four-session curricular sequence that uses his research program with black widows to introduce middle school science students to scientific discovery.  

Education

  • Ph.D. Biology, University of Kentucky 2003 
  • M.S. Biology, Illinois State University 1998
  • B.A. Biopsychology, Earlham College, Richmond, IN 1990

Publications

  • Halpin, R & Johnson JC. A continuum of behavioral plasticity in urban and desert black widows. Ethology (2014).
  • Johnson JC, Trubl P, Miles L, & Hagenmaier A. Maternal effects on egg investment and offspring performance in black widow spiders. Animal Behaviour (2014).
  • Still M, Gburek T, Miles L & Johnson JC. Adverse effects of fluoresecent dust marking on the behavior of western black widow spiderlings. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, (2014).
  • Johnson, JC. Challenging a recent challenge to the aggressive spillover hypothesis. Ethology (2013).
  • Johnson, JC, Miles L & Trubl P. Black widows in an urban desert: city living compromises spider fecundity and egg investment despite urban prey abundance. American Midland Naturalist (2012).
  • Trubl P, Highfill T, Miles L & Johnson JC. Black widows in an urban desert: population variation in an arthropod pest across metropolitan Phoenix. Urban Ecosystems (2012).
  • *Johnson A, *Revis O, & Johnson JC. Chemical cues left by prey influence urban microhabitat selection by black widow spiders (Latrodectus hesperus). Journal of Arachnology (2011).
  • *Trubl P, *Blackmore V & Johnson JC. Wasteful killing in black widows: adaptive gluttony or behavioral syndrome of voracity?. Ethology, 117: 236-245 (2011).
  • Johnson JC, *Trubl P, *Blackmore V & *Miles L. Male black widows court well-fed females more than starved females: silken cues indicate sexual cannibalism risk. Animal Behaviour, (2011).
  • Pruitt JN, DiRienzo N, Kralj-Fiser S, Johnson JC, Sih A. Individual- and condition-dependent effects on habitat choice and choosiness. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, (2011).
  • Johnson JC, Kitchen K & Andrade MCB. Family affects sibling cannibalism in the black widow spider, Latrodectus hesperus. Ethology (2010).
  • Johnson, JC & Sih, A. Fear, food, sex and parental care: evidence for a syndrome of anti-predator behavior in the semi-aquatic fishing spider (Dolomedes triton). Animal Behaviour (2007).
  • James Johnson. Cohabitation of juvenile females with mature males promotes sexual cannibalism in fishing spiders. Behavioral Ecology (2005).
  • James Johnson. The role of body size in mating interactions of the sexually cannibalistic fishing spider Dolomedes triton. Ethology (2005).
  • James Johnson, A Sih. Precopulatory sexual cannibalism in fishing spiders (Dolomedes triton): a role for behavioral syndromes. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (2005).
  • Johnson, James. Behavioral correlations among aggressive contexts in the Australian Redback spider, Latrodectus hasselti. (2005).
  • A Sih, A Bell, James Johnson. Behavioral syndromes: an ecological and evolutionary overview. Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2004).
  • A Sih, A Bell, James Johnson. Reply to Neff & Sherman: Behavioral syndromes versus Darwinian algorithms. Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2004).
  • A Sih, A Bell, James Johnson, R Ziemba. Behavioral syndromes: an integrative overview. Quarterly Review of Biology (2004).
  • S Sakaluk, M Campbell, A Clark, James Johnson, P Keorpes. Hemolymph loss during nuptial feeding constrains male mating success in sagebrush crickets. Behavioral Ecology (2004).
  • James Johnson. Pre-copulatory sexual cannibalism in fishing spiders: the ecology of an extreme sexual conflict. (2003).
  • A Bell, J Davis, J DeBose, S Long, K Mabry, T Stankowich, J Watters, James Johnson. Greatest hits in behavioral ecology. Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2002).
  • James Johnson. Sexual cannibalism and fecundity selection in fishing spiders (Dolomedes triton): an evaluation of two explanations for female aggression towards potential mates. Anim. Behav (2001).

Research Activity

Courses

Fall 2019
Course Number Course Title
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Title
HON 272 The Human Event
BIO 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2018
Course Number Course Title
HON 171 The Human Event
ENV 394 Special Topics
LSC 394 Special Topics
LSC 484 Internship
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
BIO 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
HON 171 The Human Event
BIO 331 Animal Behavior
LSC 484 Internship
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2017
Course Number Course Title
HON 272 The Human Event
BIO 320 Fundamentals of Ecology
LSC 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2016
Course Number Course Title
HON 171 The Human Event
BIO 331 Animal Behavior
LSC 484 Internship
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
BIO 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2016
Course Number Course Title
BIO 320 Fundamentals of Ecology
LSC 322 Fundamentals of Ecology Lab
LSC 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Fall 2015
Course Number Course Title
LSC 484 Internship
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Summer 2015
Course Number Course Title
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction
Spring 2015
Course Number Course Title
BIO 320 Fundamentals of Ecology
LSC 322 Fundamentals of Ecology Lab
LSC 492 Honors Directed Study
LSC 493 Honors Thesis
LSC 499 Individualized Instruction

Presentations

  • J. Chadwick Johnson1, Gina M. Hupton2, Dianna Bonney3, Monica Elser2. The web of inquiry: urban black widow behavior as a tool to teach the scientific process. National meeting poster session (Jul 2010).
  • JC Johnson. The urban behavioral ecology of black widows: can city living turn a cannibal communal?. ASU Polytechnic Natural Science Seminar (Feb 2010).
  • JC Johnson. Male mate choice in black widows: chemical and physical cues allow males to avoid sexual cannibalism by poor condition females. National meeting presentation (Jan 2010).
  • JC Johnson. Population differences among urban and desert black widows. national meeting poster (Jan 2010).
  • JC Johnson. The urban behavioral ecology of black widows: can city living turn a cannibal communal?. Socia Insect Group semianr, ASU Tempe (Dec 2009).
  • JC Johnson. Black widow males prefer chemical and physical cues from fed females thus avoiding attacks from starved females. national meeting presentation (Aug 2008).
  • JC Johnson. Black widow males prefer chemical and physical cues from fed females thus avoiding attacks from starved females. national meeting presentation (Jun 2008).

Service

  • Animals, Editorial board (2010 - Present)
  • MNS Searches, member (2009 - Present)
  • Events, member (2009 - Present)
  • Multiple journals (see CV), Reviewer (2008 - Present)
  • Personnel Committee, member (2014 - 2017)
  • Urban Naturalist, Board of editors (2013 - 2016)
  • Search Committee for a new Director, member (2014 - 2015)
  • MNS Seminar series, co-organizer (2012 - 2015)
  • Academic Senate, alternate (2013 - 2014)
  • College Teaching Instrument committee, Chair (2013 - 2014)
  • Animal Behavior Society, Reviewer for Graduate student grants (2013 - 2014)
  • Animal Behavior Society, Co-organizer workshop (2010 - 2011)
  • seminar organization, coordinator (2008 - 2011)