Ian Hogue

Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
7501
Assistant Professor
Faculty
TEMPE Campus
Mailcode
7501

Biography

Ian Hogue is an assistant professor in the Biodesign Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy and the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University.

He earned a B.A. in molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, where he performed undergraduate research on baculoviruses and worked as a laboratory technician studying alphavirus vaccine vectors at Chiron Corporation. He worked as a laboratory technician at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center studying HIV-1 latency. He then earned his Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology at the University of Michigan, studying HIV-1 assembly. He then completed postdoctoral training at Princeton University, studying alpha herpesvirus egress and spread.

Professor Hogue’s research focuses on neurovirology, the molecular and cell biology of viruses in the nervous system. Specifically, his laboratory uses specialized live-cell fluorescence microscopy methods, cryo electron microscopy structural biology methods, and primary neuron cell culture methods to study how alpha herpesviruses interact with the molecular and cell biology of neurons.

Education

  • Postdoctoral Research, Princeton University
  • Ph.D. Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan
  • B.A. Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California-Berkeley

Google Scholar

Research Interests

Neurovirology...

the study of viruses in the nervous system

Many diverse and unrelated viruses are capable of entering the nervous system, often causing severe neurological diseases. Viral neurological diseases are often acute (e.g. encephalitis), but can also cause or contribute to chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Some viruses enter the nervous system from the blood by breaching the blood-brain barrier, but others can directly infect neurons in the peripheral nervous system, and then spread from neuron to neuron via neuronal synapses. The diseases caused by rabies, polio, and herpes viruses have been known to humanity for millennia, and many newly emerging viral diseases such as West Nile and Zika viruses most recently, directly infect neurons. Most broadly, our laboratory is interested in the molecular and cellular mechanisms of how neurotropic viruses enter, transport within, and spread within the specialized cell biology of neurons.

 

Alpha Herpesviruses...

among the very few viruses evolved to exploit the mammalian nervous system

The herpesviruses constitute a large, ancient, and highly diverse family of viruses. There are herpesviruses of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and even oysters, and for the most part, these viruses have co-evolved and co-speciated with their natural hosts for tens or hundreds of millions of years. There are nine human herpesviruses divided into three sub-families. The viruses in the alpha herpesvirus sub-family infect neurons, and are among the very few viruses that have evolved to make their living in the mammalian nervous system.

Human Alpha Herpesviruses:

  • Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1)
  • Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2)
  • Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV)

In the natural course of disease, these viruses infect the sensory and autonomic neurons of the peripheral nervous system, and establish a life-long latent infection in these neurons. Occasionally, the virus replication can reactivate, leading to asymptomatic shedding of virus, or the recurrence of herpetic lesions (e.g. oral and genital lesions in the case of HSV-1 and -2, and shingles in the case of VZV). Rarely, but most frequently in immunocompromised, newborn, and elderly patients, all three human alpha herpesviruses can spread to the central nervous system, causing severe herpes encephalitis. Critically, both the mild form of disease (herpetic lesions) and severe form of disease (herpes encephalitis) depends on the ability of virus particles to transport long distances inside infected neurons.

 

Major Projects

  • Egress of Virus Particles from Infected Cells by Exocytosis        
  • Intracellular Sorting, Axonal Transport, and Egress in Primary Neurons       
  • Structural Biology of Viral Axonal Transport in collaboration with Dr. Wah Chiu, Stanford University.

 

Publications

Hogue IB, Ambrosini AE, Deshmukh N, Berry MJ, Enquist LW. Alpha Herpesvirus Egress and Spread from Neurons Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms and Does Not Depend on Action Potential Firing. In preparation.

Hogue IB, Card JP, Rinaman L, Staniszewska Goraczniak H, Enquist LW. Characterization of the neuroinvasive profile of a pseudorabies virus recombinant expressing the mTurquoise2 reporter in single and multiple injection experiments. J Neurosci Methods, 308:228-239, 2018.

Chen H, Bartee M, Yaron J, Liu L, Zhang L, Zheng D, Hogue I, Bullard W, Tibbets S, Lucas A. Mouse Gamma Herpesvirus MHV-68 Induces Severe Gastrointestinal (GI) Dilatation in Interferon Gamma Receptor-Deficient Mice (IFNγR−/−) That Is Blocked by Interleukin-10. Viruses, 10(10):518, 2018.

Hogue IB, Jean J, Scherer J, Enquist LW. A Functional Carboxy-Terminal Fluorescent Protein Fusion to Pseudorabies Virus Small Capsid Protein VP26. J Virology, 92(1):e01193-17, 2018.

Koyuncu OO, MacGibeny MA, Hogue IB, Enquist LW. Compartmented neuronal cultures reveal two distinct mechanisms for alpha herpesvirus escape from genome silencing. PLOS Pathogens, 13(10):e1006608, 2017.

Hogue IB, Scherer J, Enquist LW. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms. mBio, 7(3): e00820-16, 2016.

Johnson BN, Lancaster KZ, Hogue IB, Meng F, Kong YL, Enquist LW, McAlpine, MC. 3D Printed Nervous System on a Chip. Lab on a Chip, 16(8):1393-1400, 2015. Featured in: The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Lab on a Chip 3D Printing Collection, 2016.

Bosse JB, Tanneti NS, Hogue IB, Enquist LW. Open LED Illuminator: A simple and inexpensive LED illuminator for fast multicolor particle tracking in neurons. PLOS One, 10(11):e0143547, 2015.

Hogue IB, Bosse JB, Engel EA, Scherer J, Hu J-R, del Rio T, Enquist LW. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research. Viruses, 7:5933-5961, 2015.

Bosse JB, Hogue IB, Feric M, Thiberge SY, Sodeik B, Brangwynne CP, Enquist LW. Remodeling nuclear architecture allows efficient transport of herpesvirus capsids by diffusion. PNAS, 112(42):E5725-E5733, 2015.

Hogue IB, Bosse JB, Hu J-R, Thiberge SY, Enquist LW. Cellular Mechanisms of Alpha Herpesvirus Egress: Live Cell Fluorescence Microscopy of Pseudorabies Virus Exocytosis. PLOS Pathogens, 10(12):e1004535, 2014.

Nguyen TD, Hogue IB, Cung K, Purohit PK, McAlpine MC. Tension induced neurite growth in microfluidic channels. Lab on a Chip, 13(18):3735-3740, 2013.

Sun XR, Badura A, Pacheco DA, Lynch LA, Schneider ER, Taylor MP, Hogue IB, Enquist LW, Murthy M, Wang SS-H. Fast GCaMPs for improved tracking of neuronal activity. Nature Communications, 4:2170, 2013.

Koyuncu OO, Hogue IB, Enquist LW. Virus Infections in the Nervous System. Cell Host & Microbe, 13(4):379-93, 2013.

Hogue IB, Llewellyn GN, Ono A. Dynamic Association between HIV-1 Gag and Membrane Domains. Molecular Biology International, 2012.

Hogue IB, Grover JR, Soheilian F, Nagashima K, Ono A. Gag induces the coalescence of clustered lipid rafts and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains at HIV-1 assembly sites on the plasma membrane. J Virology, 85(19):9749-66, 2011.

Llewellyn GN, Hogue IB, Grover JR, Ono A. Nucleocapsid promotes localization of HIV-1 Gag to uropods that participate in virological synapses between T Cells. PLOS Pathogens, 6(10):e1001167, 2010.

Hogue IB, Hoppe A, Ono A. Quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag-Gag interaction: relative contributions of the CA and NC domains and membrane binding. J Virology, 83(14):7322-36, 2009.

Bauer AL, Hogue IB, Marino S, Kirschner DE. The Effects of HIV-1 Infection on Latent Tuberculosis. Mathematical Modelling of Natural Phenomena, 3(7):229, 2008.

Marino S, Hogue IB, Ray CJ, Kirschner DE. A methodology for performing global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in systems biology. J Theoretical Biology, 254(1):178-96, 2008.

Hogue IB, Bajaria SH, Fallert BA, Qin S, Reinhart TA, Kirschner DE. The dual role of dendritic cells in the immune response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. J General Virology, 89(9):2228-2239, 2008. Featured in: The Society for General Microbiology’s Microbiology Today, November 2008.

Chukkapalli V, Hogue IB, Boyko V, Hu WS, Ono A. Interaction between Gag matrix domain and phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate is essential for efficient Gag-membrane binding. J Virology, 82(5):2405-17, 2008.

Lehrman G, Hogue IB, Palmer S, Jennings C, Spina CA, Wiegand A, Landay AL, Coombs RW, Richman DD, Mellors JW, Coffin JM, Bosch RJ, Margolis DM. Depletion of latent HIV-1 infection in vivo: a proof-of-concept study. Lancet, 366(9485):549-55, 2005.

Courses

Fall 2019
Course Number Course Title
MIC 495 Undergraduate Research
MIC 498 Pro-Seminar
MIC 591 Seminar
MIC 791 Seminar
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Title
MCB 494 Special Topics
MIC 494 Special Topics
NEU 494 Special Topics
MBB 494 Special Topics
BIO 494 Special Topics
MIC 495 Undergraduate Research
BIO 495 Undergraduate Research
MIC 498 Pro-Seminar
MIC 590 Reading and Conference
MIC 591 Seminar
NEU 591 Seminar
MCB 591 Seminar
MBB 591 Seminar
BIO 591 Seminar
MIC 791 Seminar
BDE 792 Research
BDE 799 Dissertation
Fall 2018
Course Number Course Title
MIC 498 Pro-Seminar
MIC 590 Reading and Conference
MIC 591 Seminar
MIC 791 Seminar
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
BIO 494 Special Topics
MCB 494 Special Topics
NEU 494 Special Topics
MIC 494 Special Topics
BIO 495 Undergraduate Research
NEU 591 Seminar
MCB 591 Seminar
BIO 591 Seminar
MIC 591 Seminar
MIC 791 Seminar