Zain Bukhari

Arizona State University
School of Life Sciences
P.O. Box 874601
Tempe
School of Life Sciences
Student Worker
Campus:
TEMPE
Mailcode:
4601

Student Information

Graduate Student
Molecular and Cellular Biology
The College of Lib Arts & Sci

Biography

Zain Bukhari is a Ph.D. student in the Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) program at Arizona State University. His background in biology, nanoscience, and biochemistry enables him to pursue opportunities in the life sciences as well as in physics. His research work, with Dr. Wayne Frasch, utilizes gold nanorods to quantify and analyze the biophysics of an enzyme known as the FoF1-ATP synthase. This work is not only innovative and interdisciplinary, but also readily applicable to the medical field via point-of-care biosensing assays.

Education

2018-present: Molecular and Cellular Biology (Ph.D.), School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

2018: Nanoscience (P.S.M.), Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

2017: Biochemistry (B.S.), School of Molecular Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

2013: High School Diploma, Gilbert Classical Academy, Gilbert, AZ

Research Interests

As scientific disciplines grow closer and closer together, physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering converge to form a new interdisciplinary field: Nanoscience.

Today, Zain Bukhari is involved with ASU's Human Anatomy & Physiology program, as well as Dr. Wayne Frasch's biophysical/biochemical research on FoF1-ATP Synthase. In the future, he hopes to be involved with the development of nanotechnologies that have applications in the medical field.

Research Group

Wayne Fraschs lab has developed new assays to examine the rotation of single molecules of molecular motor proteins under a microscope. The lab focuses on the Fo and F1-ATPase rotary motors that comprise the FoF1 ATP synthase. This protein complex synthesizes the majority of ATP in almost all living organisms, which provides the energy for many cellular processes. 

The research group also creates nano-scale devices by assembling molecules of DNA and proteins in novel ways that can carry out specific tasks. These include the incorporation of the F1-ATPase molecular motor into devices that detect single molecules of toxins, drugs or DNA profiles of interest that can provide an early indication of infection or disease. Other nano-devices use the assembly of DNA molecules to make computations.

Publications

1. Frasch W.D., Bukhari Z., and Martin J.L. (2018). F1-ATPase Dwell and Power Stroke Relationships. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) Bioenergetics, 1859, e25. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbabio.2018.09.078

Courses

Fall 2019
Course Number Course Title
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Spring 2019
Course Number Course Title
BIO 201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I
Fall 2018
Course Number Course Title
BIO 201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Spring 2018
Course Number Course Title
BIO 201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Fall 2017
Course Number Course Title
BIO 201 Human Anatomy/Physiology I
BIO 202 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Presentations

  • Angular Velocity and Dwell Analyses of the F1-ATPase Molecular Motor; Preview Presentation. Gordon Research Conference on Bioenergetics, Andover, NH; 2019; https://www.grc.org/bioenergetics-conference/2019/
  • Ditto; Poster. Gordon Reserach Conference on Bioenergetics, Andover, NH; 2019
  • Dwell Analyses of the F1-ATPase Molecular Motor; Seminar. School of Life Sciences Molecular and Cellular Biology Colloquium, Arizona State University; 2019; https://biodesign.asu.edu/news/dwell-analyses-f1-atpase-molecular-motor-and-fo-motor-mechanisms-f-type-atp-synthase
  • Torsion Spring Contributions to the F1-ATPase Molecular Motor Mechanism; Supervised Applied Project Defense. Department of Physics, Arizona State University; 2018; https://nanoscience.asu.edu/students/zain-bukhari
  • Ditto; Poster. Department of Physics Nanoscience Capstone Conference, Arizona State University; 2018
  • Dependence of the angular velocity of rotation on rotational position at which ATP-binding occurs at the empty catalytic site of the F1-ATPase molecular motor; Thesis Defense. Barrett, the Honors College, Arizona State University; 2017; http://hdl.handle.net/2286/R.I.42248

Honors/Awards

School of Life Sciences Doctoral Recruitment Award, Arizona State University, 2018

Graduate College Fellowship, Arizona State University, 2018

Moeur Award, Arizona State University, 2017

School of Molecular Sciences Hypercube Award, Arizona State University, 2016

Letter of Commendation, United States Congressman Matt Salmon, 2013

Salutatorian Award, Gilbert Classical Academy, 2013

Service

Ambassador of The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Arizona State University, 2019

School of Life Sciences Mentor, Arizona State University, 2016